Tag Archives: exercises

Cycling – Building Up My Stamina Gradually

Cycling with Carole and Strava – Building Stamina

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“Next time? Longer ride.”  That was my goal after the 13 mile China Camp loop with Marin Cyclists on May 10th (see post below). On that ride I met a new cyclist friend and we’ve done two rides together. 14 miles. 20 miles yesterday.

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Loving the Strava app. It divides your ride into segments giving your personal best segments for the ride. It ranks you with other riders who’ve done the same segment, even narrowing it down by sex and age. It was motivating while I was riding, aiming to best myself.

 

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Get the Most Out of Your Walking

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Here’s a link to an EXCELLENT article on walking! It details how you can change variables (speed, hills climbing, arm pumping, and more) to get the most out of your walking minutes. The tips on posture and stride  are excellent, as well.

http://www.superskinnyme.com/how-to-lose-weight-walking.html

 

You’re Going to Age (hopefully): Why Not Prepare for It?

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Take your fingers out of your ears and listen to me! You. Are. Going. To. Get. Old. Unless you don’t. Get strong now and make it easier on yourself. “Nobody wants to think about fixing the roof while the sun is shining,” says actor Rob Lowe, in a recent SF Chronicle article, as keynote speaker for an event on aging, where he talked about donning a “suit” that stimulates being in an older body. The suit includes a helmet that stifles hearing and vision; heavy, imbalanced boots; restrictive fabric that gives the effect of arthritis in the knees, hands, spine and elbows; and sleeves weighed down to imitate muscle loss. The truth is that moving around, getting out of chairs or up off the floor is harder as you get older and more so if you are carrying extra weight. On top of that, as explained in a WebMD article, beginning“…in your 30s, you begin to lose muscle mass and function, a condition known as age-related sarcopenia.”. Being active helps counteract this ongoing muscle loss.

Rob Lowe credits his youthful looks to surfing, skiing, CrossFit, running, and swimming. He, along with many of us, hope to live our golden years with gusto. Many individuals in their 70’s, 80’s and 90’s are living full lives, while others are walker-users who can barely get out of a chair and ambulate. Some are active but have begun falling and, in some cases, have difficulty getting up. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related deaths in people over 65 according to the New York Times, Bracing for the Falls of an Aging Nation. To get up off the floor uses nearly every muscle in your body plus a fair amount of flexibility, not to mention putting a tremendous amount of weight on your wrists, and knees. To get up from a chair and stand takes strength in your chest, arms, gluteals, shoulders, legs, core, and ankles. The stronger you are, the less chance of these basic movements being a problem. Don’t wait until you have a crisis to start getting stronger.

How are you preparing for physically aging? I know, you’re not old yet and you’re in decent shape, lots of energy, walk on the treadmill, do Zumba, and garden. When was the last time you had a physical assessment to determine your strengths, weaknesses, and flexibility? Does your current exercise program strengthen ALL the muscles shown in this picture and include balance and flexibility exercises?

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Why not prepare to excel in aging, just as you have for other events in your life…running a marathon, getting a good grade in a class, planning a big work project, assuring your kids turn out okay. You plan ahead. You prepare. You put your heart into it. You practice. You get competitive. You envision the outcome you want. Do that now with your fitness. Make a Plan.

A personal trainer can help you. First, we will conduct a fitness assessment to find imbalances or weaknesses and then help you develop a program to address them. You can quickly begin to make changes in your strength and flexibility. Participants in my Gymformee-Introduction to the Gym class, an ongoing offering at Body Kinetics, where I work, demonstrated better balance and strength gains after just eight classes.

A testimony to the power of daily effort, this man improved his flexibility and was able to touch his toes after just 41 days of practice.Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 10.06.22 PM

 

 

TWO SIMPLE TESTS YOU CAN TRY AT HOME

 Get Up Off the Floor Test

Simply lower down to the floor, sit, and stand back up. If you are able to do so without assistance from any limbs, you score 10 points, 5 for getting up and 5 for getting down.

10 Points Possible as pictured here

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 Subtract 1 point each, both for standing up and sitting down, using assistance from a hand, knee, forearm, hand on knee, or side of leg.

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 This test not only assesses flexibility, balance, strength, and mobility, but may also be a measure of your mortality according to a study conducted by Brazilian physician Claudio Gil Araujo. These two links (Simple Sitting Test Predicts How Long You’ll Live) and (RQOW: Getting Up From the Floor) further describe the study, the test, and provide a link to a YouTube video of the original test.

Stand up, Sit Down Test

Arms crossed, touching chest, rise to full stand, return to fully seated, as many times as possible in 30 seconds. Below is an excerpt from the Senior Fitness Test Manual table ranking you with individuals your age at 95 percentile ranking. If you’re younger than 60 you can still see how you compare.

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PRACTICE TO DO AT HOME

Practice getting off the floor daily.

Sit on the floor to do something (put on your socks, eat off the coffee table, etc.) so you have to get up. Or just practice – check out this link for a “how to” .

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Using a chair or other assistance can lessen pressure on joints. If you have back, hip, wrist, or knee issues, check with your doctor first for the safest way to get up off the floor.

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Make a Habit of Getting Out of Your Chair Unassisted

Notice how you get out of your chairs during your day. Do you have the habit of using the arm rests? If so, change to standing up unassisted. Even better, do chair squats or regular squats everyday. (For knee safety, as you squat back it’s hips, not knees, first, then weight back on heels as you slowly lower; knees stay behind toes.)

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Studies show any amount of regular exercise will benefit you! If you want to get amazing results and become functionally younger than you are today, take this advice from the authors of Younger Next Year, on the secret to great health, “You should exercise hard almost every day of your life – say six days a week. And do strength training…two of those six days. Exercise is the great key to aging.”

 Take Action Now! Make a plan yourself or enlist the help of a personal trainer, but get going. Plan for six days of exercise to include:

 Components of an Overall Fitness Program

  • Strength training: two times per week
  • Aerobic/“Cardio” activities: 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity (less minutes with high intensity workouts)
  • Flexibility (Yoga, Pilates) two times per week
  • Balance: daily

 The good news is that by working hard and getting strong, you can feel better immediately and benefit for the rest of your life.

 References

Stephanie M. Lee,” Does this outfit make me feel old? It’s suppose to”, San Francisco Chronicle, Business Report, page 1, November 21, 2004  http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Ageless-Rob-Lowe-promotes-suit-that-simulates-5907449.php
Reviewed by William Blahd, MD, “Sarcopenia with Aging”, WebMD, 50+: Live Better, Longer, August 3, 201  http://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/sarcopenia-with-aging?page=2
Katie Hafner, “Bracing for the Falls of an Aging Nation”, New York Times, Health Section, Page 1, November 2, 2014  http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/11/03/health/bracing-for-the-falls-of-an-aging-nation.html?_r=0
Paige Waehner, “How to Safely Get Up and Down From the Floor”, About Health, May 1, 2004 http://exercise.about.com/od/exerciseforseniors/ss/Get-Up-And-Down-From-Floor.htm?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=shareurlbuttons_nip
Chair squat image: Arun Shanbhag, “Knee Exercises: Chair Squats”, Aches & Joints, April 27, 2008. http://achesandjoints.org/2008/04/27/chair-squats/
Getting off floor with chair image: Exercise & Physical Activity: Your Everyday Guide from the National Institute on Aging, Health and Aging, September 2, 2014   http://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/exercise-physical-activity/sample-exercises-flexibility
Body image from:   http://www.builtlean.com/2011/09/15/full-body-workout-vs-split-routine-which-is-better/
Chris Crowley & Henry S. Lodge, M.D., Younger Next Year, Workman Publishing Company, Inc., 2007, p. 14

Great Push Up Video

Here’s a short video demonstrating good push up form as well as how this simple body weight exercise can be a full body workout when done properly. David Jack, Men’s Health Magazine, posted these instructions.

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http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/weight-free-upper-body-workout?cm_mmc=Pinterest-_-MensHealth-_-Content-Fitness-_-WeightlessChestWorkout

Top 10 reasons to do Weight Training

Top ten reasons to do weight training? Here they are.imgres

10. Add spice to your gym life. Get off those big machines and try mixing it up with exercises that work your whole body synergistically. Weight training has a new face. It’s just not pumping iron. Using your body away from the machines can be more fun and uses balance and functional movements like bending and squatting.
9. Can be done with minimal equipment…a small set of hand weights, a few props and your own body weight.
8. A variety of equipment can be used to change it up. Just one exercise like the row can be performed with hand weights, bands, TRX/Rip 60 straps, cable and stationary machines sitting or standing. Rows can be performed kneeling on a bench, from a plank position, standing in a bent row, or lying over a Swiss ball. Balance and core muscles can be challenged from instability by standing on one leg, rowing single armed, standing on a foam pad, a Bosu, a single leg or in a deep squat.
7. No time for boredom. You only have to do 8-20 repetitions of each exercise then you take a break or move on. Beginners start at a low intensity weight with more reps (12-20) to build endurance and gradually progressive overload is applied where the weight is increased and the reps decreased (8-12) so that the last rep is performed only with effort.
6. Workout plans can be designed in many ways, depending on your training goals, and easily changed as your fitness changes. Two examples to begin with are: vertical loading, performing each exercise set (of 8-20 repetitions, see above) in a circuit style then repeating each exercise set two to three times or horizontal loading, performing each exercise set, two or three times, then moving on to the next exercise.
5. Can be done with just a few exercises. As few as four basic exercises based off the squat, row, chest press, and plank can build overall body strength, core stability and improve balance. (Not counting stretching done before and after each workout.)
4. Gets results. Your body will change visibly. Twice a week great results, three times a week amazing results, add cardio two or three times a week and you are strong and buff (if you are lean enough to see the muscle). Don’t worry, ladies, you won’t bulk up, you’ll firm up.
3. Burns more calories. Muscle burns calories so the more muscle you have the more calories you burn. From Women’s Fitness Magazine, “..the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that women who completed an hour-long strength-training workout burned an average of 100 more calories in the 24 hours afterward than they did when they hadn’t lifted weights.” (April, 2009)
2. Makes you stronger in everyday life. It’s proven to never be too late to start weight training. Being stronger helps you lift and move and carry and bend and squat and reach and do whatever you do and to keep your balance while you’re at it.
1. Fights aging. Really. Mentally, physically Best exercise modality to do so. Science says so.

Read more about the benefits of strength training in this Mayo Clinic article on fitness.
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/strength-training/HQ01710/NSECTIONGROUP=2

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